The American Journal of Psychology

Child Study at Clark University. An Impending New Step Author(s): G. S. H. Source: The American Journal of Psychology, Vol. 14, No. 1 (Jan., 1903), pp. 96-106 Published by: University of Illinois Press Stable URL: https://www.jstor.org/stable/1412220 Accessed: 20-12-2018 20:54 UTC

JSTOR is a not-for-profit service that helps scholars, researchers, and students discover, use, and build upon a wide

range of content in a trusted digital archive. We use information technology and tools to increase productivity and

facilitate new forms of scholarship. For more information about JSTOR, please contact support@jstor.org.

 

Your use of the JSTOR archive indicates your acceptance of the Terms & Conditions of Use, available at

University of Illinois Press is collaborating with JSTOR to digitize, preserve and extend access to The American Journal of Psychology

This content downloaded from 198.246.186.26 on Thu, 20 Dec 2018 20:54:58 UTC All use subject to https://about.jstor.org/terms

 

 

CHILD STUDY AT CLARK UNIVERSITY.

AN IMPENDING NEW ST]P.

By G. S. H.

It is now nearly nine years since the first child study ques- tionnaire was printed at Clark University. Now over one hun- dred have been issued and over fifty books and articles, entirely or in part based on returns from these questionnaires, have been published. Only a few questionnaires have been entirely abortive. Many of the best papers have needed a second set of questions and data, quite a number of topics already in have not yet been worked up, and a number are in various stages of preparation. In connection with the new quarters of the psychological department, two large rooms have been set apart for this work. In one computations are made and data compiled, and literature gathered; and for the other a special library of child study, including the following questionnaires and articles as a nucleus, and special literature on each impor- tant topic is begun. Another new step will be taken in the coming Summer

School as indicated in the following announcement. “Dr. Hall will offer a course of daily conferences on child study, its methods and results. This will be a distinctly new course on probably about twelve topics. Each member will be furnished with syllabi and be expected to do some definite work in both standard topics and others now under investigation to bring out the logic of this work, its errors and defects.”

Next year in the regular course this work will be expanded in a series of weekly exercises throughout the year. This will cover nearly forty of the chief topics, and much attention will be paid to the discussion of the sources of error, the different methods and their evaluation, and the many new problems in logic suggested.

More elaborate bibliographies on special topics may be pub- lished from time to time throughout the year.

In connection with the gift of $,000o by Mr. Arthur S. Estabrook, of Boston, and the grant of $2,ooo for this work from the Carnegie Institution, a competent and well trained re- search assistant has been engaged, all of whose time is devoted to working up data and to assisting students whose theses or other work happens to fall in this field.

This content downloaded from 198.246.186.26 on Thu, 20 Dec 2018 20:54:58 UTC All use subject to https://about.jstor.org/terms

 

 

CHILD STUDY AT CLARK UNIVERSITY.

Finally, methods of co-operation are now being agreed on between this line of work at Clark University and a number of select institutions elsewhere, whose professors and others have already taken great interest in or shown special aptitude for this work. This, it is believed, will secure data of the required kind and amount.

At first child study passed through a period of criticism such as few new scientific movements in the modern world, save evo- lution alone, have had to sustain. It had, too, a host of camp followers who had little conception of its meaning and no idea of its severity of scientific method, and who offered many very vulnerable points of attack. Some fouror five years ago, when the critics were loudest and most aggressive, many superficial observers thought the movement dead. But it has steadily spread to department after department. In insanity it has given us’ the new studies of dementia praecox; has almost re-created the department of juvenile criminology; furnished a new method of studying the most important problems of phi- lology (as illustrated in the one sample bibliography on this subject appended); has revolutionized and almost re-created school hygiene; made adolescence, a strange word ten years ago, one of the most pregnant and suggestive for both science and education; given us the basis of a new religious psychology; and laid the foundation of a new and larger philosophy and psychology of the future, based not on the provincial study of a cross-section of the adult mind, but on a broad, genetic basis. The few able psychological and philosophical professors, who still refuse to accept it, as Agassiz did evolution, will not escape the same kind of criticism meted out to him.

The importance of this new movement it is hard to overesti- mate. It has brought a new and large hope into a field that was in danger of lapsing, either to mere literary brilliancy or to aridity in theories of ultimate reality, or in the massing of experimental data on points not always selected with breadth, wisdom and perspective. It is doing a work for the child at school akin to that of the Reformation for the religious life of the adult, and the verdicts on many of the most important questions of method and matter for all educational grades, from birth to college, when fully rendered will be more or less final and will give education what it has long lacked-a truly scien- tific basis, and help to give to teachers a really professional status.

A. LIST OF TOPICAL SYLLABI IN ORDER.

I. Anger, G. S. Hall, Oct., 1894. 2. Dolls, G. S. Hall, Nov., I894.

” (Supplementary Questionnaire.) A. C. Ellis, June, 1896.

97

This content downloaded from 198.246.186.26 on Thu, 20 Dec 2018 20:54:58 UTC All use subject to https://about.jstor.org/terms

 

 

3. Crying and laughing, G. S. Hall, Dec., I894. 4. Toys and playthings, G. S. Hall, Dec., I894. 5. Folk-lore among children, G. S. Hall, Jan., I895. 6. Early forms of vocal expression, G. S. Hall, Jan., 1895. 7. The early sense of self, G. S. Hall, Jan., I895. 8. Fears in childhood and youth, G. S. Hall, Feb., 1895. 9. Some common traits and habits, G. S. Hall, Feb., I895.

Io. Some common automatisms, nerve signs, etc., G. S. Hall, March, I895.

II. Feeling for objects of inanimate nature, G. S. Hall, March, I895. 12. Feelings for objects of animate nature, G. S. Hall, April, I895. 13. Children’s appetites and foods, G. S. Hall, April, I895. 14. Affection and its opposite states in children, G. S. Hall, April,

1895. 15. Moral and religious experiences, G. S. Hall, May, 1895. i6. Peculiar and exceptional children, G. S. Hall and E. W. Bohan-

non, Oct., I895. 17. Moral defects and perversions, G. S. Hall and G. E. Dawson, Oct.,

I895. I8. The beginnings of reading and writing, G. S. Hall and H. T.

Lukens, Oct., I895. 19. Thoughts and leelings about old age, disease and death, G. S.

Hall and C. A. Scott, Nov., 1895. 20. Moral education, G. S. Hall and N. P. Avery, Nov., 1895. 21. Studies of school reading matter, G. S. Hall andJ. C. Shaw, Nov.,

I895. 22. School statistics, G. S. Hall and T. R. Croswell, Nov., I895. 23. Early musical manifestations, G. S. Hall and Florence Marsh,

Dec., 1895. 24. Fancy, imagination, reverie, G. S. Hall and E. H. Lindley, Dec.,

1895. 25. Tickling, fun, wit, humor, laughing, G. S. Hall and Arthur Allin,

Feb., I896. 26. Suggestion and imitation, G. S. Hall and M. H. Small, Feb., 1896. 27. Religious experience, G. S. Hall and E. D. Starbuck, Feb., I896. 28. A study of the character of religious growth, E. D. Starbuck. 29. Kindergarten, G. S. Hall, Anna E. Bryan and Lucy Wheelock,

March, 1896. 30. Habits, instincts, etc., in animals, G. S. Hall and R. R. Gurley,

March, 1896. 3I. Number and mathematics, G. S. Hall and D. E. Phillips, April,

I896. 32. The only child in a family, G. S. Hall and E. W. Bohannon,

March, 1896. 33. Degrees of certainty and conviction in children, G. S. Hall and

M. H. Small, Oct., 1896. 34. Sabbath and worship in general, G. S. Hall and J. P. Hylan, Oct.,

I896. 35. Questions for the study of the essential features of public wor-

ship, J. P. Hylan. 36. Migrations, tramps, truancy, running away, etc., vs. love of home,

G. S. Hall and L. W. Kline, Oct., I896. 37. Adolescence and its phenomena in body and mind, G. S. Hall and

E. G. Lancaster, Nov., 1896. 38. Examinations and recitations, G. S. Hall and J. C. Shaw, Nov.,

1896. 39. Stillness, solitude, restlessness, G. S. Hall and H. S. Curtis, Nov.,

1896.

98 HALL:

This content downloaded from 198.246.186.26 on Thu, 20 Dec 2018 20:54:58 UTC All use subject to https://about.jstor.org/terms

 

 

CHILD STUDY AT CLARK UNIVERSITY.

40. The psychology of health and disease, G. S. Hall and H. H. God- dard, Dec., 1896.

4I. Spontaneously invented toys and amusements, G. S. Hall and T. R. Croswell, Dec., 1896.

42. Hymns and sacred music, G. S. Hall and T. R. Peede, Dec., 1896. 43. Puzzles and their psychology, G. S. Hall and E. H. Lindley, Dec.,

1896. 44. The sermon, G. S. Hall and A. R. Scott, Jan., 1897. 45. Special traits as indices of character, and as mediating likes and

dislikes, G. S. Hall and E. W. Bohannon, Jan., 1897. 46. Reverie and allied phenomena, G. S. Hall and G. E. Partridge,

April, I897. 47. The psychology of health and disease, G. S. Hall and H. H.

Goddard, May, 1897. 48. Immortality, G. S. Hall and J. R. Street, Sept., 1897. 49. Psychology of ownership vs. loss, G. S. Hall and L. W. Kline,

Oct., I897. 50. Memory, G. S. Hall and F. W. Colegrove, Oct., I897. 5I. To mothers, F. W. Colegrove, Dec., I897. 52. Humorous and cranky side in education, G. S. Hall and L. W.

Kline, Oct., 1897. 53. The psychology of shorthand writing, G. S. Hall and J. O.

Quantz, Nov., I897. 54. The teaching instinct, G. S. Hall and D. E. Phillips, Nov., I897. 55. Home and school punishments and penalties, G. S. Hall and C.

H. Sears, Nov., I897. 56. Straightness and uprightness of body, G. S. Hall, Dec., I897. 57. Conventionality, G. S. Hall and A. Schinz, Nov., I897. 58. Local voluntary association among teachers, G. S. Hall and H. D.

Sheldon, Dec., 1897. 59. Motor education, G. S. Hall and E. W. Bohannon, Dec., 1897. 60. Heat and Cold, G. S. Hall, Dec., I897. 6I. Training of Teachers, G. S. Hall and W. G. Chambers, Dec,, I897. 62. Educational ideals, G. S. Hall and L. E. York, Dec., I897. 63. Water psychoses, G. S. Hall and F. B. Bolton, Feb., I898. 64. The institutional activities of children, G. S. Hall and H. D.

Sheldon, Feb., I898. 65. Obedience and obstinacy, G. S. Hall and Tilmon Jenkins, March,

1898. 66. The sense of honor among children, G. S. Hall and Robert Clark,

March, I898. 67. Children’s collections, Abby C. Hale, Oct., I898. 68. The organizations of American student life, G. S. Hall and H. D.

Sheldon, Nov., 1898. 69. Mathematics in common schools, G. S. Hall and E. B. Bryan,

Feb., I899. 70. Mathematics in the early years, G. S. Hall and B. B. Bryan, Feb.,

I899. 71. Unselfishness in children, G. S. Hall and W. S. Small, Feb., 1899. 72. Mental traits, C. W. Hetherington, April, I899. 73. The fooling impulse in man and animals, G. S. Hall and Norman

Triplett, March, I899. 74. Confessions, G. S. Hall and B. W. Runkle, March, I899. 75. Pity, G. S. Hall, March, I899. 76. Perception of rhythm by children, G. S. Hall and C. H. Sears,

May, 1899. 77. The monthly period, Anna L. Brown, May, 1899. 78. Perception of rhythm, C. H. Sears, Dec., 1899.

JOURNAL-7

99

This content downloaded from 198.246.186.26 on Thu, 20 Dec 2018 20:54:58 UTC All use subject to https://about.jstor.org/terms

 

 

79. Psychology of uncertainty, G. S. Hall and C. J. France, Feb., x9oo. 1900.

So. Straightness and uprightness of body, G. S. Hall and A. W. Trettien, Jan., 1900.

8I. Pedagogical pathology, G. S. Hall and Norman Triplett, Nov., 1900.

82. Religious development, G. S. Hall and C. H. Wright, Jan., I90o. 83. Geography, G. S. Hall and F. H. Saunders, Feb., I901. 84. Feelings of adolescence, E. J. Swift, Oct., 1901. 85. Introspection, E. J. Swift, Oct., I901. 86. Signs of nervousness, E. J. Swift, Oct., I90I. 87. Examinations, W. M. Pollard, Nov., I90o. 88. Sub-normal children and youth, A. R. T. Wylie, Nov., I901. 89. English, G. S. Hall, Dec., I90o. go. Education of women, G. S. Hall, Dec., I90o. 9I. Heredity, C. E. Browne, Dec., I90o; (a) Jan., 1902. 92. The conditions of primitive peoples and the methods employed

to civilize and Christianize them, J. E. W. Wallin, April, 1902. 93. Children’s thoughts, reactions and feelings to animals, G. S. Hall

and W. F. Bucke, Nov., I902. 94. Reactions to light and darkness, G. S. Hall, Nov., I902. 95. Children’s interest in flowers, Alice Thayer, Nov., 1902. 96. Reactions to light and darkness (2), G. S. Hall and Theodate L.

Smith, Dec., 1902. 97. Superstition among children, S. W. Stockard, Dec., I902. 98. Questionnaire on the soul, L. D. Arnett, Jan., 1903. 99. Questionnaire on children’s prayers, S. P. Hayes, Jan., 1903. Ioo. Questions about food and appetite, Sanford Bell, Jan., 1903. IoI. Questionnaire on religious experiences subsequent to conversion,

B. P. St. John, Jan., I903. 102. Development of the sentiment of affection, Theodate L. Smith,

March, 1903.

B. PUBLISHED BOOKS AND ARTICLES BASED WHOLLY OR IN PART ON THE PRECEDING QUESTIONNAIRES, THE

NUMBERS FOLLOWING THOSE OF THE LATTER ABOVE.

I. G. S. HALL. A study of anger. Am.Jour. of Psy., July, 1899, Vol. 10, pp. 516-591.

2. G. S. HALL and A. C. ELLIS. A study of dolls. Ped. Sem., Dec., 196, Vol. 4, pp. 129-175.

3. G. S. HALL and ARTHUR ALLIN. The psychology of tickling, laughing, and the comic. Am.Jour. of Psy., Oct., I897, Vol. 9, pp. I-4I. See Sully: Essay on laughter, N. Y., I902; Psychol- ogy of tickling, C. R. IVe Cong. Int. de Psy., Paris, I9OI; Laughter of savages, Int. Mo., Sept. 1901. Also H. M. Stanley: Remarks on tickling and laughing, Am. Jour. of Psy., Vol. 9, p. 235; and G. V. N. Dearborn: The nature of the smile and laugh, Science, June I, 1900.

4. See Bucke. 5. J. W. SLAUGHTER. The moon in childhood and folklore. Am.

Jour. of Psy., April, I902, Vol. 13, pp. 394-318. See supplemen- tary noteby G. S. Hall. Also Miriam V. Levy: How the man got in the moon. Ped. Sem., Vol. 3, p. 3I7.

G. S. HALL and J. E. W. WALLIN. How children and youth think and feel about clouds. Ped. Sem., Dec., 1902, Vol. 9, pp. 460-506.

I00 HALL:

This content downloaded from 198.246.186.26 on Thu, 20 Dec 2018 20:54:58 UTC All use subject to https://about.jstor.org/terms

 

 

CHILD STUDY AT CLARK UNIVERSITY.

6. H. T. LUKENS. Preliminary report on the learning of language. Ped. Sem., June, 1896, Vol. 3, pp. 424-460. See Frederick Tracy: Language of Childhood, Am.Jour. of Psy., Vol. 6, p. IO7; and Psychology of Childhood, Boston, 1893. Also Lillie A. Williams: Children’s interest in words, Ped. Sem., Sept., 1902; J. R. Street: A study in language teaching, Ped. Sem., Vol. 4. Refer to 3.

7. G. S. HALTL. Some aspects of the early sense of self. Am. Jour. of Psy., April, 1898, Vol. 9, pp. 351-395. See Arnett’s His- tory of concepts of the soul. Also H. M. Stanley: On the early sense of self. Science, 1898, Vol. 8, p. 22.

8. G. S. HALL. A study of fears. Am. Jour. of Psy., Jan., I897,Vol. 8, pp. I47-249. See H. M. Stanley: Rational fear of thunder and lightning, Am. Jour. of Psy., Vol. 9, p. 418. Anna B. Sivi- ter: Fears of childhood discovered by a mother, Kgn. Mag., Vol. 12, p. 82. S. H. Rowe: Fear in the discipline of the child, Outlook, Sept. 2, 1898, Vol. 60, p. 232. Colin A. Scott: Child- ren’s fears as material for expression, etc., Trans. Ill. Soc., for Child Study, Vol. 3, p. I2. T. S. Clouston: Developmental insanities and psychoses, Tuke’s Dict. of Psy., Medicine, Vol. I, p. 357. A. Binet: La peur chez les enfants, L’Ann6e Psy- chol., Vol, 2, p. 223.

9. See Lindley and Partridge on Automatisms. IO. E. H. LINDLEY and G. E. PARTRIDGE. Some mental automatisms.

Ped. Sem., July, 1897, Vol. 5, pp. 4I-60. See G. E. Partridge: Reverie, Ped. Sem., Vol. 5, p. 445.

II. G. H. ELLrS. Fetichism in children. Ped. Sem., Vol. 9, p. 205. Also G. S. Hall: The love and study of nature. Agriculture of Mass., 1898, p. I34. See work on Moon, Clouds, Water, Heat, Light and Darkness, etc.

13. See Bell. I4. SANFORD BELL. A preliminary study of the emotion of love be-

tween the sexes. Am.Jour. of Psy., Vol. 13, p. 325. See Frank Drew, Ped. Sem., Vol. 2, p. 504. Also Miss Smith’s present work.

I5. See Leuba and Starbuck. I6. E. W. BOHANNON. Peculiar and exceptional children. Ped. Sem.,

Oct., I896, Vol. 4, pp. 3-60. See his Only child in a family. Ped. Sem., Vol. 5, p. 475.

I7. G. E. DAWSON. A study in youthful degeneracy. Ped. Sem., Dec., 1896, Vol. 4, pp. 221-258. See Frederic Burk: Teasing and bullying. Ped. Sem., Vol. 4, p. 336. A. R. T. Wylie: On the psychology and pedagogy of the blind. Ped. Sem., Vol. 9, p. 127. G. E. Dawson: Psychic rudiments and morality. Am. Jour. of Psy., Jan., 1900, Vol. II, pp. 181-224. See Kuhlmann.

I8. See Lukens. 6. 19. C. A. ScorT. Old age and death. Am. Jour. of Psy., June, 1896,

Vol. 8, pp. 67-122. 21. J. C. SHAW. A test of memory in school children. Ped. Sem.,

Vol. 4, p. 6i. 23. FREDERIC BURK. The evolution of music and the pedagogical

application. Proc. California Teachers’ Ass’n, 1898; and Study of kindergarten problems. San Francisco, 1899, p. 23. M. Meyer: How a musical education should be acquired in the pub- lic school. Ped. Sem., Vol. 7, p. 124; and Contributions to a psychological theory of music. Univ. of Missouri Studies, Vol. I, No. I. J. A. Gilbert: Experiments on the musical sensitive- ness of school children. Studies from Yale Psy. Lab., Vol. i, pp. 80-87. Fanny B. Gates: Musical interests of children. Jour. of Ped., Vol. II, p. 265. See also Norton and papers on rhythm.

IOI

This content downloaded from 198.246.186.26 on Thu, 20 Dec 2018 20:54:58 UTC All use subject to https://about.jstor.org/terms

 

 

24. See Partridge: Reverie. 25. See 3. 26. M. H. SMALL. The suggestibility of children. Ped. Sem., Dec.,

1896, Vol. 4, pp. 176-220. See Imitation. 27 and 28. E. D. STARBUCK. A study of conversion. Am. Jour. of

Psy., Jan., I898, Vol. 8, pp. 268-308; Some aspects of religious growth, Am. Jour. of Psy., Oct., 1897, Vol. 9, pp. 70-124; The psychology of religion, Charles Scribner’s Sons, N. Y., I899, pp. 423.

29. FREDERICK EBY. The reconstruction of the kindergarten. Ped. Sem., July, 900oo, Vol. 7, pp. 229-286. See G. S. Hall: Some de- fects of the kindergarten in America. Forum, Jan., 1900, Vol. 28, p. 579.

30. R. R. GURLEY. The habits of fishes. Am. Jour. of Psy., July, 1902, Vol. 13, pp. 408-425. See studies on white rats, dogs, monkeys, etc.

3I. D. E. PHILLIPS. Genesis of number forms, Am. Jour. of Psy. July, 1897, Vol. 8, pp. 506-527; Number and its application psy- chologically considered, Ped. Sem., Oct., 1897, Vol. 5, pp. 221- 282; Some remarks on number and its application, Ped Sem., April, 1898, Vol. 5, pp. 590-599. See John Dewey; Some re- marks upon the psychology of number. Ped. Sem., Vol. 5, p. 426.

32. E. W. BOHANNON. The only child in a family. Ped. Sem., April, I898, Vol. 5, pp. 475-496.

33. M. H. SMALL. Methods of manifesting the instinct for certainty. Ped. Sem., Jan., 1898, Vol. 5, pp. 313-380.

34 and 35. J. P. Hylan: Public worship. Open Court Pub. Co., Chicago, 1901. pp. 94.

36 L. W. KLINE. The migratory impulse vs. love of home. Am. Jour. of Psy., Oct., 1898, Vol. 10, pp. 256-279; Truancy as related to the migrating instinct, Ped Sem., Vol. 5, p. 38I.

37. E. G. LANCASTER. The psychology and pedagogy of adolescence. Ped. Sem., July, 1897, Vol. 5, pp. 6I-128. See G. S. Hall: Moral and religious training of children, Princeton Rev., Vol. IO, p. 26. and The moral and religious training of childreu and adoles- cents, Ped. Sem., Vol. I, p. I96. W. H. Burnham: The study of adolescence, Ped. Sem., Vol. I, p. 174. A. H. Daniels: The new life, Am. Jour. of Psy., Vol. 6, p. 6I.

38. See Pollard. 39. M. H. SMALL. On some psychical relations of society and soli-

tude. Ped. Sem., April, 900o, Vol. 7, pp. 13-99. H. S. Curtis: Inhibition. Ped. Sem., Oct., 1898, Vol. 6, pp. 65-II3. See literature on crowds.

40. H. H. GODDARD. The evidence of mind on body as evidenced by faith cures. Am.Jour. of Psy., April, I899, Vol. 10, pp. 431-502. See 47 and 73.

4I. T. R. CROSWELL. Amusements of Worcester school children. Ped. Sem., Sept., 1899, Vol. 6, pp. 314-37I. See G. E. Johnson: Education by plays and games. Ped. Sem., Vol. 3. p. 97.

42. See music and rhythm. 43. E. H. LINDLEY. A study of puzzles with special reference to the

psychology of mental adaptation. Am. four. of Psy., July, 1897, Vol. 8, pp. 431-493

46. G. E. PARTRIDGE. Reverie. Ped. Sem., April, 1898, Vol. 5, pp. 445-474. See Automatisms.

47. See 40. 48. J. R. STREET. A genetic Study of immortality. Ped. Sem., Sept.,

1899, Vol. 6, pp. 267-313. See Scott: Old Age and Death, 19.

102 HALL:

This content downloaded from 198.246.186.26 on Thu, 20 Dec 2018 20:54:58 UTC All use subject to https://about.jstor.org/terms

 

 

CHILD STUDY AT CLARK UNIVERSITY.

49. L. W. KLINE, and C. J. FRANCE. The psychology of ownership. Fed. Sem., Dec., 1899, Vol. 6, pp. 421-470.

50. F. W. COLGROVE. Individual memories. Am. Jour. of Psy.,Jan., I899. Vol. io, pp. 228-255; and Memory, Henry Holt and Co., N. Y., 1900, pp. 369. See Uhl; Memory. G. S. Hall: Boy life in a Massachusetts country town. Proc. Am. Antiq. Soc., Worces- ter, Mass., Oct. 21, 1890, Vol. 7, p. Io7.

53. J. O. QUANTZ. The physiology of shorthand. Phonographic World, March, I898, Vol. 13, pp. 292-293.

54. D. E. PHILLIPS. The teaching instinct. Ped. Sem., March, 1899, Vol. 6, pp. 188-246.

55. C. H. SEARS. Home and school punishments. Ped. Sem., March, 1899, Vol. 6, pp. I59-187.

56. A. W. TRETTIIEN. Creeping and walking. Am. Jour of Psy., Oct., 1900, Vol. 12, pp. 1-57. See 80.

60. G. S. HALL and C. E. BROWNE. Children’s ideas of fire, heat, frost and cold. Ped. Sem., Vol. io.

62. G. S. HALL. The ideal school as based on child study. Proc. N. E. A., 1901, p. 475; Forum, Vol. 33, p. 24; Paidologist, Vol. 3, p. I61. See P. W. Search: An ideal school. D. Appleton and Co., N. Y., 190o.

63. F. E. BOLTON. Hydro-psychoses. Am.Jour. of Psy., Jan., 1899, Vol. 10, pp. 171-227.

64. H. D. SHELDON. The institutional activities of American chil- dren. Am.Jour. of Psy., July, I898, Vol. 9, pp. 425-448.

67. See Caroline F. Burk: The collecting instinct. Ped. Sem., Vol. 7, p. 179.

68. H. D. SHELDON. The history and pedagogyof American student societies. D. Appleton and Co., N. Y., I90I, pp. 366,

73. NORMAN TRIPLETT. The psychology of conjuring deceptions. Am. Jour. of Psy., July, 1900, Vol. II, pp. 439-510. See 40 and 47.

75. G. S. HALL and F. H. SAUNDERS. Pity. Am. Jour. of Psy., July, 1900, Vol. II, pp. 534-591. See Sutherland: The origin and growth of the moral instinct. 2 vols. Longmans, Green and Co., London, I893. H. M. Stanley: The psychology of pity. Science, I900, Vol. 12, p. 487.

76 and 78. C. H. SEARS. Studies in rhythm. Fed. Sen., March, 9gol, Vol. 8, pp. 3-44; A contribution to the psychology of rhythm. Am. Jour. of Psy., Jan., 1902, Vol. 13, pp. 28-61. See T. L. Bol- ton: Rhythm. Am. Jour. of Psy., Vol. 6, p. I45.

79. C. J. FRANCE. The gambling impulse. Am. Jour. of Psy., July, I902., Vol. 13, pp. 364-407.

80. See 56. 83. MARGARET K. SMITH. Report on geography. Ped. Sem. Vol. 9,

p. 385. 84. Standards of efficiency in school and in life. Ped. Sem., Vol. Io, 87. See Pollard. 88. A. R. T. WYLIE. On the psychology and pedagogy of the blind.

Ped. Sem., June, 1902, Vol. 9, pp. I27-160. See E. C. Sanford: The writings of Laura Bridgman. Overland, Mo., 1886-7. G. S. Hall. Laura Bridgman. Mind, Vol. 4, p. 149.

89. LILLIE A. WILLIAMS. Children’s interest in words. Ped. Sem., Sept., I902.

90. KATHERINE E. DOLBEAR. A few suggestions for the education of women. Ped. Sem., Vol. 8, p. 548.

94 and 96. G. S. HALL and THEODATE L. SMITH. Reactions to light and darkness. Am. Jour., of Psy., Vol. 14.

IO3

This content downloaded from 198.246.186.26 on Thu, 20 Dec 2018 20:54:58 UTC All use subject to https://about.jstor.org/terms

 

 

C. A SAMPLE BIBLIOGRAPHY. FROM MR. L. N. WILSON’S LISTS.

Topic. The Development of Language in the Child. AMBNT, WILHELM. Die Entwicklung von Sprechen und Denken

beim Kinde. E. Wunderlich, Leipzig, 1899, pp. 213. DEweY, JOHN. Psychology of infant language. Psy. Rev., Jan.,

1894, Vol. I, pp. 63-66. EGGER, M. E. Observations et reflexions sur le developpement de

l’intelligence et du langage chez les enfants. A. Picard, Paris, 1887, pp. 102.

GALE, HARLOW. The vocabularies of three children of one family to two and a half years of age. Psy. Studies, Univ. of Minn., July, 1900, No. I, pp. 70-117.

GREENWOOD, J. M. On children’s vocabularies. Ann. Rep. Kansas City Public Schools, 1887, pp. 52-65.

GUTZMANN, HERMANN. Die Sprachlaute des Kindes und der Natur- v6lker. Zeits. f. pid. Psy., Jan., 1899, Vol. i, pp. 28-40.

HOLDEN, EDWARD S. On the vocabularies of children under two years of age. Trans. Am. Philol. Ass’n, 1877, pp. 58-68. Re- print. Case, Lockwood and Brainard Co., Hartford, Conn., 1878.

HUMPHREYS, MILTON W. A contribution to infantile linguistics. Trans. Am. Philol. Ass’n, I880, Vol. 9, pp. 5-17.

KIRKPATRICK, E. A. Promising line of child study for parents. Trans. Ill. Soc. for Child Study, Jan., 1899, Vol. 3, pp. I79-I82.

LENZ R. Ueber Ursprung und Entwicklung der Sprache. Die Neueren Sprachen, Marburg, 1901, Vol. 8, pp. 449-472, 513- 534, 577-589; Vol. 9, pp. 1-12.

LINDNER, GUSTAV. Aus dem Naturgarten der Kindersprache. Ein Beitrag zur kindlichen Sprach-und Geistesentwickelung in den ersten vier Lebensjahren. L. Fernan, Leipzig, I898, pp. 122.

LOMBROSO, PAOLO. L’instinct de la conversation chez l’enfant. Rev. Philos., Oct., 1896, Vol. 42, pp. 379-390.

LUKENS, H. T. Preliminary report on the learning of language. Ped. Sem., June, 1896, Vol. 3, pp. 424-460.

OLTUSZEVSKI, W. Die geistige und sprachliche Entwickelung des Kindes. H. Cornfeld, Berlin, 1897, pp. 43.

POLLOCK, F. An infant’s progress in language. Mind, July, 1878, Vol. 3, pp. 392-401.

ROUSSEB, C. Notes sur l’apprentissage de la parole chez un enfant. La Parole, 1899, Vol. 9, pp. 791-799; 870-880. La Parole, I900, Vol. Io, pp. 23-41; 86-99.

RZBSNITZEK, EMIL. Zur Frage der psychischen Entwickelung der Kindersprache. G. P. Aderholz, Breslau, I899. pp. 35.

SAINT-PAUL, G. Le Visu6lisme et l’etude des langues. Rev. Scient., 1900, 4th Ser., Vol. 14, pp. 239-240.

SCHULTZE, FRITZ. Die Sprache des Kindes. Eine Anregung zur Erforschung der Gegenstandes. E. Giinther, Leipzig, I880, pp. 46.

SIKORSKY, M. Du developpement du langage chez les enfants. Ar- chives de Neurologie, Nov., 1883, Vol. 6, pp. 3I9-336.

STUMPF, CARL. Eigenartige sprachliche Entwickelungeines Kindes. Zeits. f. Pad. Psy., Dec., 1901, Vol. 3, pp. 4I9-447.

SULLY, JAMES. Baby linguistics. Eng. Illus. Mag., Nov., 1884, Vol. 2, pp. 110-118.

TAINE, M. De l’acquisition du langage chez les enfants et dans l’es- pece humaine. Rev. Philos., Jan., 1876. (Trans. in Mind, April, 1877, Vol. 2, pp. 252-259.)

IO4 HALL:

This content downloaded from 198.246.186.26 on Thu, 20 Dec 2018 20:54:58 UTC All use subject to https://about.jstor.org/terms

 

 

CHILD STUDY AT CLARK UNIVERSITY.

TOISCmHR, W. Die Sprache der Kinder. (Samml. gemeinniitz., Vortr., 248.) F. Haerpfer in Komm., Prag., 1899.

TRACY, FREDERICK. The language of childhood. Am. Jour. of Psy., Oct., 1893, Vol. 6, pp. Io7-138.

WUNDT, WILHELM. Volkerpsychologie: eine Untersuchung der Ent- wickelungsgesetze von Sprache, Mythus und Sitte. Engel- mann, Leipzig, 900o, Vol. I, Pts. I and 2, pp. 627, 642.

Secret and Telegraphic Language. BRYAN, W. L. and HARTER, NOBLE. Studies in the Physiology and

psychology of the telegraphic language. Psy. Rev., Jan., 1897, Vol. 5, pp. 27-53.

BRYAN, W. L. and HARTER, NOBLE. Studies on the telegraphic lan- guage: acquisition of a hierarchy of habits. Psy. Rev., July, I899, Vol. 6, pp. 346-375.

CHRISMAN, OSCAR. Secret language of children. Science, Dec., I, 1893, Vol. 22, p. 303. Child Study Mo., Sept., 1896, Vol. 2, pp. 202-211. North Western Mo., Oct., 1897, Vol. 8, pp. I87-I93. North Western Mo., Jan., and June, 1898, Vol. 8, pp. 375-379; 649-65I.

CHRISMAN, OSCAR. The secret language of childhood. Century, May, 1898, Vol. 56, pp. 54-58.

Pedagogical. BURK, FREDERIC and CAROLINE FREAR. A study of the kindergarten

problem. (Chapter on language.) Whittaker & Ray Co., San Francisco, 1899. pp. 123.

CHAMBERLAIN, A. F. Notes on Indian child language. Am. Antrop., July, I890, Vol. 3, pp, 237-241; July, 1893, Vol. 6, pp. 321-322.

CHAMBERLAIN, A. F. The child and childhood in folk-thought. Macmillan & Co., New York, 1896. pp. 464.

CHAMBERLAIN, A. F. The child. A study in the evolution of man. Scribner’s, New York, I900, pp. 498.

DAVIDSON, S. G. Relation of language teaching to mental development and of speech to language teaching. Ass’n Rev., Dec., I899, Vol. I, pp. I39-I49.

CROSZMANN, M. P. E. Language teaching from a child study point of view. Child Study Mo., Nov., 1898, Vol. 4, pp. 266-278.

HANCOCK, JOHN A. Children’s tendencies in the use of written lan- guage forms. North Western Mo., June, I898, Vol. 8, pp. 646-649.

MESSER, AUGUST. Kritische Untersuchungen iiber Denken, Sprechen und Sprachunterricht. Sammlung v. Abh. a. d. Geb. d. Pad. Psy. u. Physiol., 1900, Pt. 6, pp. 5I.

OHLERT, A. Das Studium der Sprachen und die geistige Bildung. Sammlung v. Abh. a. d. Geb. d. Pad. Psy. u. Physiol., 1899, Vol. 2, Pt. 7, pp. 50.

QUICK, R. H. Life and remains. (Chapter on language.) Edited by F. Storr. Macmillan Co., New York, 1899. pp. 544.

SCHILLER, H. Der Aufsatz in der Muttersprache. Sammlung v. Abh. a. d. Geb. d. Pad. Psy. u. Physiol., 1900, Vol. 3, Pt. I, pp. 68.

STREET, J. R. A study in language teaching. Ped. Sem., April, 1897, Vol. 4, pp. 269-293.

Abnormal.

BASTAIN, H. C. Aphasia and other speech defects. Lewis, London, 1898, pp. 314.

BELLIANINE, C. Troubles de la parole dans l’hemiplegie infantile. Maloine, Paris, 1898, pp. 33.

Io5

This content downloaded from 198.246.186.26 on Thu, 20 Dec 2018 20:54:58 UTC All use subject to https://about.jstor.org/terms

 

 

o16 HALL.

BOOTH, FRANK W. Statistics of speech teaching in schools for the deaf in the United States. Proc. N. E. A., 900o, pp. 668-670.

COI,JNS, JOSEPH. The genesis and dissolution of the faculty of speech: a clinical and psychological study of aphasia. Mac- millan Co., New York, 1898. pp. 432.

DUPRAT, G. L. Les troubles de la parole chez l’enfant. Manuel Gen. de l’Instruction Primaire, May 5, 1900, No. I8, pp. 277-279.

GUTZMAN, H. Des Kindes Sprache und Sprachfehler. Gesundheitsl- ehre der Sprache fur Eltern, Erzieher und Aerzte. J. J. Webber, Leipzig, 1894, pp. 264.

GUTZMANN, H. Das Stottern. Rosenheim, Frankfurt a. M., 1898. PP. 467.

LIEBMANN, A. Die Sprachst6rungen geistig zuriickgebliebener Kinder. Sammlung v. Abh. a. d. Geb. d. Pid. Psy. u. Physiol., 1901, Vol. 4, Pt. 3, pp. 78.

LIEPMANN, H. Sprachstorung und Sprachentwickelung. Neurol. Centralblatt, I900, Vol. 19, pp. 695-703.

MITKE, ROBERT. Die Behandlung stammelnder und stotternder Schiller. Breslau, I898. pp. 30.

SCHWENDT, A. Examen clinique et acoustique de 60 sourds-muets. La Parole, I899, Vol. 9, pp. 641-672.

SCHWENDT, A. Les restes auditifs des sourds-muets peuvent-ils etre utilises pour leur apprendre h mieux parler? La Parole, I899, Vol. 9, pp. 845-869.

Other select bibliographies will be printed later.

This content downloaded from 198.246.186.26 on Thu, 20 Dec 2018 20:54:58 UTC All use subject to https://about.jstor.org/terms

 

  • Contents
    • image 1
    • image 2
    • image 3
    • image 4
    • image 5
    • image 6
    • image 7
    • image 8
    • image 9
    • image 10
    • image 11
  • Issue Table of Contents
    • The American Journal of Psychology, Vol. 14, No. 1, Jan., 1903
      • Front Matter [pp.i-iv]
      • What Is Life? [pp.1-11]
      • The Plethysmographic Evidence for the Tridimensional Theory of Feeling [pp.13-20]
      • Reactions to Light and Darkness [pp.21-83]
      • A Plea for Summaries and Indexes [pp.84-87]
      • Note on Moon Fancies [pp.88-91]
      • The Simplicity of Color Tones [pp.92-95]
      • Child Study at Clark University. An Impending New Step [pp.96-106]
      • A Compressed Air Device for Acoustic and General Laboratory Work [pp.107-112]
      • Professor Calkins on Mental Arrangement [pp.113-114]
      • Literature
        • untitled [pp.115-116]
        • untitled [pp.116-117]
        • untitled [pp.117-119]

"Is this question part of your assignment? We can help"

ORDER NOW