Intellectual quotient (IQ)

PLEASE REPLY TO EACH DISCUSSION WITH SIGNIFICANT CONTENT. DO NOT JUST AGREE WITH THE STUDENT BUT PROVIDE SUPPORTING CONTENT IF YOU AGREE OR DISAGREE. THERE ARE THREE DISCUSSION RESPONSE. PLEASE RESPOND WITH A MINUMUM OF 1-2 PARAGRAGHS FOR EACH DISCUSSION.

1 day ago

Kendra Ogdahl 

IQ vs. EQ

 

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Intellectual quotient (IQ), also referred to as general intelligence, is a person’s ability to learn basic knowledge and use it in everyday life situations while Emotional intelligence (EQ) defines a person’s reasoning abilities such as perceiving, understanding and regulating emotions.  (Lam, 2002). But which intelligence is a better indicator of one’s professional success? While both may be very important in a person’s career, it can also depend on the type of career that the person is in.  A person working in the medical field may be more successful if their EQ is equal to or higher than their IQ. This is because people working in the healthcare field center their work around their patients and it is important to establish a professional relationship with their patients to help deal with any emotional aspects (Romanelli, 2006).  However, emotional intelligence can also be helpful to the working professional in the corporate setting as well depending on the department in which they work.  A person working in the Information Technology (IT) world may not require a great deal of EQ so for their profession, the IQ is a greater indicator of success but a person working in the Human Resources department may be more successful if their EQ is high because they have the ability to interact and help employees out with any issues they may have. In fact, in one study conducted which tested a person’s ability to perceive and regulate emotions, the results showed that overall emotional intelligence was associated with better scores relating to their general intelligence or IQ (Lam, 2002).

References

Lam, L., & Kirby, S. L. (2002). Is emotional intelligence an advantage? an exploration of the impact of emotional and general intelligence on individual performance. The Journal of Social Psychology, 142(1), 133-43. doi:http://dx.doi.org.nuls.idm.oclc.org/10.1080/00224540209603891

Romanelli, F., Cain, J., & Smith, K. M. (2006). Emotional intelligence as a predictor of academic and/or professional success. American Journal of Pharmaceutical Education, 70(3), 8-69. Retrieved from https://nuls.idm.oclc.org/login?url=https://search-proquest-com.nuls.idm.oclc.org/docview/211254344?accountid=25320

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Tony Hogan 

WK3 Discussion

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How does the Buddhist idea of no-self differ from western proposals that emphasize, for example, a Positive Psychology?

The Buddhist idea of non-self or Anatta is the belief that the soul and the personal self does not exist; the idea of self is an illusion. Buddhism teaches that a belief in the existence of a personal self leads to self-centered thoughts, egoism, pride, and several other destructive emotions. The ability to abstain from these thoughts is believed to be a form of mental discipline that is essential to following the Eightfold Path. This belief is in stark contrast with the aim of positive psychology. One of the vital pillars of positive psychology is an emphasis on positive individual traits. According to Personal psychologist’s, focusing on character strengths will lead to contentment in life. Whereas the principle of anatta denies the existence of positive individual traits as human beings are thought to be only the sum of our parts; focusing on the illusion of our individual attributes leads to the creation of ego, which in turns causes suffering.

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4 hours ago

Trisha Duperval 

Wk 3 Discussion

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1. Our vernacular connotation of the word “maturity” typically correlates with ideal psychological functionality. How is maturity defined by A. Maslow, E. Fromm, or C.J. Jung (choose one)? What element of this definition do you feel is most adaptive in our society today?

Carl Jung believed that there was a process that progresses development and maturity. He defined maturity “as a clear comprehension and acceptance of one’s purpose in life”. Jung describes the four stages of life “The athlete, the warrior, the statement and the spirit”. The athlete, is the least matured and the most self-absorbed. The warrior is when individuals start to take in more responsibilities and is more goal oriented. The statement is the stage when individuals try to aim for changes in their lives and set personal achievements. The spirit is when individuals hit the final stages and noticing their nature in quality.

 

I believe Carl Jungs view of maturity is very adaptive to our society today. Maturity plays an important role in very one’s stages of life as we grow and age. Everyone experiences the elements differently. I personally have notice some of the stages of maturity in myself. Some people do not achieve their stages but we all try to fulfil their goals.

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